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Saved and Shared Stories from Michael Novakhov

Saved Stories – None: Window on Eurasia — New Series: Demographer who Told ‘NYTimes’ 70 Percent of Covid Cases in Moscow weren’t Being Recorded Now Out of a Job


Paul Goble
            Staunton, July 3 – Aleksey Raksha, a Russian demographer who told the New York Times that 70 percent of covid-19 cases in Moscow were not reflected in the official statistics, is out of a job at the Russian statistical administration. He didn’t say whether he was fired, but there can be no doubt he did not have future there (meduza.io/news/2020/07/03/demografa-alekseya-rakshu-usomnivshegosya-v-ofitsialnoy-statistike-smertey-ot-covid-19-uvolili-iz-rosstata).
            The official figures today were 6718 new infections, bringing that total to 667,883; and 176 deaths, raising that total to 9859 (t.me/COVID2019_official/948). But independent analysts say the death total is at least 15,072, more than 50 percent greater than Russian officials acknowledge (zona.media/coronagraph).
            And health minister Mikhail Murashko said that only 40 doctors in Russia had died from the coronavirus, far longer than others have reported. He did acknowledge that the causes of a number of other deaths from infections are still under investigation and that the total could change (interfax.ru/russia/715741).
            Murashko also said that a second wave of the pandemic is improbable in Russia (versia.ru/v-rossii-vyyavleno-6718-novyx-sluchaev-zarazheniya-koronavirusom-i-176-letalnyx-isxodov); although other experts said that the chances there would be a second wave were quite large (versia.ru/v-rossii-vyyavleno-6718-novyx-sluchaev-zarazheniya-koronavirusom-i-176-letalnyx-isxodov).
            But the minister did say that he does not believe Russia will be able to return to a normal existence until February 2021 at the earliest, an assessment that is significantly less optimistic than those being offered by Vladimir Putin (interfax.ru/russia/715739).
            Pandemic problems continued across Russia. A Moscow election official who handled voting in the referendum this past week has been diagnosed with the coronavirus and may have infected numerous people who took part (tvrain.ru/teleshow/vechernee_shou/uik_korona-511797/).
            Moscow museums which have reopened – about 30 percent have – have become hotspots of new infections (interfax.ru/moscow/715628). Investigators are also looking into several explosions of the virus at children’s facilities in various parts of the country (mbk-news.appspot.com/suzhet/koronavirus-v-rossii-xronika/and versia.ru/v-rossii-vyyavleno-6718-novyx-sluchaev-zarazheniya-koronavirusom-i-176-letalnyx-isxodov).
            And Russian consumer affairs monitors said today that there had been more than 500 cases of the violation of anti-epidemic recommendations at airports over the last three weeks (kommersant.ru/doc/4399954?tg).
            Having cut back or eliminated national projects in demography, health care and accessible living, the Russian government has now decided to do the same thing with the one directed at boosting small businesses, a step that makes their recovery even more problematic (finanz.ru/novosti/aktsii/chinovniki-postavili-krest-na-malom-biznese-1029363688).
            Russian processing industries showed some improvement in June compared to May but will still have “colossal” losses for the year, analysts say (agoniya.eu/archives/6569). Banks are increasingly demanding repayments although they have been willing to restructure existing loans (iz.ru/1027264/vadim-arapov/tak-sebe-kanikuly-klienty-bankov-zhaluiutsia-na-peresmotr-kreditnykh-uslovii).
            And the Krizis-Kopilka portal lists the following problems facing the Russian economy: growing budget deficits, devaluation, overdue loans, falling interest rates on deposits, a worsening investment crisis, possible new sanctions by the US, and a collapse of the Russian currency and debt markets (krizis-kopilka.ru/archives/77841).
            Finally today, the Meduza news agency reported the results of a poll it has taken of Russians who have been working at home. The survey shows that most Russians want to keep their jobs but don’t want to have to return to the office five days a week (meduza.io/short/2020/07/03/my-znaem-chto-vy-ne-hotite-vozvraschatsya-v-ofis).

Window on Eurasia — New Series

Saved Stories – None