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Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Evidence of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 in cats and dogs from households in Italy | bioRxiv



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Evidence of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 in cats and dogs from households in Italy

E.I. Patterson, G. Elia, A. Grassi, A. Giordano, C. Desario, M. Medardo, S.L. Smith, E.R. Anderson, T. Prince, G.T. Patterson, E. Lorusso, M.S. Lucente, G. Lanave, S. Lauzi, U. Bonfanti, A. Stranieri, V. Martella, F. Solari Basano, V.R. Barrs, A.D. Radford, U. Agrimi, G. L. Hughes, S. Paltrinieri, N. Decaro
E.I. Patterson

1Departments of Vector Biology and Tropical Disease Biology, Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK

G. Elia

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

A. Grassi

3I-VET srl, Laboratorio di Analisi Veterinarie, Via Ettore Majorana, 10 – 25020 Flero (BS), Italy

A. Giordano

4Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy; Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Milan, Via dell’Università 6, 26900 Lodi, Italy

C. Desario

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

M. Medardo

5La Vallonèa Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, via G. Sirtori 9, 20017 Passirana di Rho (MI), Italy

S.L. Smith

6Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Chester High Road, Neston, CH64 7TE, UK

E.R. Anderson

1Departments of Vector Biology and Tropical Disease Biology, Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK

T. Prince

7NIHR Health Protection Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Department of Clinical Infection, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool UK

G.T. Patterson

6Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Chester High Road, Neston, CH64 7TE, UK

E. Lorusso

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

M.S. Lucente

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

G. Lanave

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

S. Lauzi

4Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy; Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Milan, Via dell’Università 6, 26900 Lodi, Italy

U. Bonfanti

5La Vallonèa Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, via G. Sirtori 9, 20017 Passirana di Rho (MI), Italy

A. Stranieri

4Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy; Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Milan, Via dell’Università 6, 26900 Lodi, Italy

V. Martella

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

F. Solari Basano

8Arcoblu s.r.l., via Alessandro Milesi 5, 20133 Milan, Italy

V.R. Barrs

9City University’s Jockey Club College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences, 5/F, Block 1A, To Yuen Building, 31 To Yuen Street, Kowloon, Hong Kong

A.D. Radford

6Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Chester High Road, Neston, CH64 7TE, UK

U. Agrimi

10Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161 Rome, Italy

G. L. Hughes

1Departments of Vector Biology and Tropical Disease Biology, Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK

S. Paltrinieri

4Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy; Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Milan, Via dell’Università 6, 26900 Lodi, Italy

N. Decaro

2Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Valenzano (BA), Italy

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 originated in animals and is now easily transmitted between people. Sporadic detection of natural cases in animals alongside successful experimental infections of pets, such as cats, ferrets and dogs, raises questions about the susceptibility of animals under natural conditions of pet ownership. Here we report a large-scale study to assess SARS-CoV-2 infection in over 500 companion animals living in northern Italy, sampled at a time of frequent human infection. No animals tested PCR positive. However, 3.4% of dogs and 3.9% of cats had measurable SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody titers, with dogs from COVID-19 positive households being significantly more likely to test positive than those from COVID-19 negative households. Understanding risk factors associated with this and their potential to infect other species requires urgent investigation.

One Sentence Summary SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in pets from Italy.

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠